Coast artist's niche, traditional 'hand carving' tattoo style

14th August 2017 4:00 PM
INK CULTURE: Artist Hori Kaz performs the traditional art of Japanese Tattoo, Tebori, at the Ink Attack Tattoo Convention. INK CULTURE: Artist Hori Kaz performs the traditional art of Japanese Tattoo, Tebori, at the Ink Attack Tattoo Convention. Warren Lynam

THE traditional Japanese style of Tebori tattooing is not the fastest way to get ink but it's Hori Kaz's preferred method.

"Machines are fast, because in one second the needle goes into the skin 100 times," he said.

The word Tebori meant "hand carving".

"It's not as smooth but the impression is, I think, stronger, more authentic."

 

Ink Attack Tattoo Convention. Hori Kaz performs the tradional art of Japnaese Tattoo,Tebori.
Hori Kaz at work at Ink Attack Tattoo Convention. Warren Lynam

Tattoo enthusiasts got a glimpse of the Japanese-born, Tokyo-trained tattoo artist's work in action at the Ink Attack Tattoo Convention in Marcoola at the weekend.

Mr Kaz has spent about five hours at work depicting the story of Oniwakamaru defeating the giant coy carp who was starving a small town by eating all the fish, and expects the tattoo will take another five hours to finish.

He said Tebori was niche style in Australian for now.

"If I have a chance or time, definitely I want to do (tattoos) the traditional way," Mr Kaz said.

 

Ink Attack Tattoo Convention. Hori Kaz performs the tradional art of Japnaese Tattoo,Tebori.
The story of Oniwakamaru being rendered in ink Tebori-style. Warren Lynam

The Caloundra-based artist, who runs Kulture Waves Tattoo Studio, said his style of tattooing also required more trust from his customers.

"I'm doing only freehand; so directly drawing on the customers' skin and then doing the tattoo (instead of using stencils)," he said.

"I think people are a bit scared to get my style."